References

Secondary Sources

The listing below includes the main academic books, journal articles, and conference reports that were consulted in the preparation of this profile. The many news articles and non-scholarly websites that were consulted in the preparation of this profile are not included in the listing below but are rather embedded as links in the profile text itself.

Islam and the Constitution

Al-Wadi’i, A. (2007) Al-Ma’ziq al-Disturi fi al-Yaman. Sana’a, Yemen: Mu’assasat al-‘Afif al-Thaqafiyya.

Astrid, J., & Schwedler, J. (2003) Who Opened the Window? Women’s Activism in Islamist Parties. Comparative Politics, 35, 293-312.

Bonnefoy, L. (2011) Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity. London: Hurst & Company.

Bonnefoy, L. (2011) Violence in Contemporary Yemen: State, Society and Salafis. The Muslim World, 101, 324-46.

Browers, M. (2007) Origins and Architects of Yemen’s Joint Meeting Parties. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 39, 565-86.

Carapico, S. (2000) Yemen and the Aden-Abyan Islamic Army. Middle East Research and Information Project.

Clark, J. A. (2004) Islamist Women in Yemen: Informal Nodes of Activism. In Q. Wiktorowicz (Ed.), Islamic Activism: A Social Movement Theory Approach, (pp. 164-84). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Dresch, P. & Haykel, B. (1995) Stereotypes and Political Styles: Islamists and Tribesfolk in Yemen. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 27, 405-31.

Dunbar, C. (1992) The Unification of Yemen: Process, Politics, and Prospects. Middle East Journal, 46, 456-76.

Haykel, B. (1999) Rebellion, Migration or Consultative Democracy? The Zaydis and their Detractors in Yemen. In R. Leveau, F. Mermier, & U. Steinbach (Eds.), Le Yémen Contemporain, (pp. 193-201). Paris: Karthala.

Hiltermann, J. (Dec. 16, 2009) Disorder on the Border: Saudi Arabia’s War Inside Yemen. Foreign Affairs.

International Religious Freedom Report. (2010). The United States Department of State.

Koehler-Derrick, G. (Ed.). (Sept. 2011). A False Foundation? AQAP, Tribes and Ungoverned Spaces in Yemen. The Combating Terrorism Center at West Point.

Maktrari, A. & McHugo, J. (Trans.). (1992). The Constitution of the Republic of Yemen. Arab Law Quarterly, 7, 70-82.

Phillips, S. (2008). Yemen’s Democracy Experiment in Regional Perspective: Patronage and Pluralized Authoritarianism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Roggio, B. (Jan. 20, 2012). AQAP Commander Says ‘the Islamic Caliphate is Coming.’ The Long War Journal.

Schwedler, J. (2002). Yemen’s Aborted Opening. Journal of Democracy, 13, 48-55.

Schwedler, J. (2004). The Islah Party in Yemen: Political Opportunities and Coalition Building in a Transitional Polity. In Q. Wiktorowicz (Ed.). (pp. 205-28). Islamic Activism: A Social Movement Theory Approach. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Shamiry, N. A. R. (2007). The Judicial System: Framework, Institutions and Traditions. In K.A. Mahdi, A. Wurth, & H. Lackner (Eds.). (pp. 99-117). Yemen into the Twenty-First Century: Continuety and Change. Reading, UK: Ithaca Press.

Taylor, L. (Sept. 26, 2011). Yemen’s Hijacked Revolution. Foreign Affairs.

Wells, M. (Feb. 27, 2012). Yemen’s Houthi Movement and the Revolution. Foreign Policy.

Yemen: Coping with Terrorism and Violence in a Fragile State. (Jan. 8, 2003). International Crisis Group.

Islam and the Legal System

Amin, S. H. (1987). Law and Justice in Contemporary Yemen: The People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen and the Yemen Arab Republic. Glasgow: Royston Limited.

Dahlgren, S.  (2007). Islam, Custom and Revolution in Aden: Reconsidering the Background to the Changes of the Early 1990s. In K.A. Mahdi, A. Wurth, & H. Lackner (Eds.). Yemen Into the Twenty-First Century: Continuity and Change. (pp. 327-45). Reading, UK: Ithaca Press, 2007.

Eraqi-Klorman, B. (2003). Yemen. In The Jews of the Middle East and North Africa in Modern Times. (pp. 289-408). New York: Columbia University Press.

Freedom House. (March 3, 2010). Women's Rights in the Middle East and North Africa 2010 – Yemen.

Human Rights Watch. (2011). ‘How Come You Allow Little Girls to Get Married?’: Child Marriage in Yemen. Retrieved from http://www.hrw.org/reports/2011/12/07/how-come-you-allow-little-girls-get-married.

Marsad al-Barlaman al-Yamani. (2011). Taqrir ada’ September 2010- Mayo 2011: al-barlaman al-yamani min ada ri’asiyya ‘alila ila mayyit fi sarir ath-thawra. Retrieved from http://ypwatch.org/pdf/ar/Third&Fourth_Parliament_Performance_Report_ar.pdf.

Ministry of Health and Population and UNICEF. (2008). Yemen Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2006. Retrieved from http://www.childinfo.org/files/MICS3_Yemen_FinalReport_2006_Eng.pdf.

Nyrop, R.F. (Ed.). (1986). The Yemens: Country Studies. Washington, DC: American University.

Scott, J. (2010). The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Shamiry, N.A.R. (2007). The Judicial System: Framework, Institutions and Traditions. In K.A. Mahdi, A. Wurth, & H. Lackner (Eds.). (pp. 99-117). Yemen Into the Twenty-First Century: Continuity and Change. Reading, UK: Ithaca Press.

World Directory of Minorities and Religious Minorities 2012 – Yemen. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.minorityrights.org/?lid=4725.

Wurth, A. (2003). Stalled Reform: Family Law in Post-Unification Yemen. Islamic Law and Society, 10, 12-33.

Tobi, Y. (1999). The Jews of Yemen: Studies in their History and Culture. Leiden: Brill.

Major Religious Communities

Bonnefoy, L. (2011). Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity London: Hurst & Company.

Bonnefoy, L. (2011). Violence in Contemporary Yemen: State, Society and Salafis. The Muslim World, 101, 324-46.

Dresch, P. & Haykel, B. (1995). Stereotypes and Political Styles: Islamists and Tribesfolk in Yemen. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 27, 405-31.

Haykel, B. (1999). Rebellion, Migration or Consultative Democracy? The Zaydis and their Detractors in Yemen. In R. Leveau, F. Mermier, & U. Steinbach (Eds.). (pp. 193-201). Le Yémen Contemporain. Paris: Karthala.

Hiltermann, J. (Dec. 16, 2009). Disorder on the Border: Saudi Arabia’s War Inside Yemen. Foreign Affairs.

International Religious Freedom Report. (2010). The United States Department of State.

Wells, M. (Feb. 27, 2012). Yemen’s Houthi Movement and the Revolution. Foreign Policy.

Political Landscape

Al-Daghsi, A.M. (2010). Al-houthiun: Al-thahira al-houthia. Sana'a, Yemen: Dar al-Kutub al-Yemenia.

Alley, A.L. (2010). Yemen's multiple crises. Journal of Democracy, 21, 4, 72-86.

Boucek, C. (2010). Examining Saudi Arabia’s 85 most wanted list. (pp. 21-24). CTC Sentinel.

Boucek, C. (2010). War in Saada: From local insurrection to national challenge. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Boucek, C., Beg, S., & Horgan, J. (2009). Opening up the jihadi debate: Yemen's committee for dialogue. In T. Bjorgo & J. Horgan (Eds.). Leaving terrorism behind: Disengagement from political violence. (pp. 181-192). New York: Routledge.

Clark, V. (2010). Yemen: Dancing on the heads of snakes. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Dresch, P. (2000). A history of modern Yemen. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Dresch, P., & Haykel, B. (1995). Stereotypes and political styles: Islamists and tribefolk in Yemen. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 27, 4, 405-431.

Freeman, J. (2009). The al-Houthi insurgency in the north of Yemen: An analysis of the Shabab al Moumineen. Studies in Conflict andTerrorism, 32, 11, 1008.

Haykel, B. (1999). Rebellion, migration or consultative democracy?: the Zaydis and their detractors in Yemen. In R. Leveau, F. Mermier & U. Steinbach (Eds.). Le Yemen contemporain (pp. 193). Paris: Editions Karthala.

In the name of unity: The Yemeni government's brutal response to southern movement protests (2009). New York: Human Rights Watch.

'Isa, A. (2012). Political Islam movements in Yemen. Beirut: Markaz Dirasat al-Wahdah al-'Arabiyah.

Johnsen, G.D. (2010). Al-Qa`ida in Yemen’s 2008 campaign. (pp. 12-15). CTC Sentinel.

Johnsen, G.D. (2010). AQAP in Yemen and the Christmas Day terrorist attack. (pp. 1-4). CTC Sentinel.

Johnsen, G.D. (2010). The expansion strategy of al-Qa`ida in the Arabian Peninsula. (pp. 4-7). CTC Sentinel.

Johnsen, G.D. & Boucek, C. (2010). The dilemma of the Yemeni detainees at Guantanamo bay. (pp. 25-28). CTC Sentinel.

O'Neill, B. (2010). AQAP a rising threat in Yemen. (pp. 7-9). CTC Sentinel.

Phillips, S. (2008). Yemen: The centrality of process. In M. Ottaway, & J. Choucair-Vizoso (Eds.). Beyond the facade: Political reform in the Arab world. (pp. 231-259). Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Phillips, S. (2011). Yemen and the politics of permanent crisis. London: Routledge.

Safi al-Din, H. (2012). Rabi' al-Yaman: tahaddiyat al-taghyir wa-al-tahdith. Beirut: Dar al-Tawfiq lil-Tiba'ah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzi'.

Salmoni, B., Loidolt, B., & Wells, M. (2010). Regime and periphery in northern Yemen: The Huthi phenomenon. Arlington, VA: RAND National Defense Research Institute.

Sharqieh, I. (2013). A lasting peace? Yemen's long journey to national reconciliation. Doha, Qatar: Brookings Doha Center.

Stracke, N. & Haidar, M.S. (2010). The southern movement in Yemen. Dubai: Gulf Research Center.

Terrill, W.A. (2011). The conflicts in Yemen and U.S. national security. Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute.

Transnational Influences

Bonnefoy, L. (2011). Salafism in Yemen: transnationalism and religious identity. London: C. Hurst & Co.

Clark, V. (2010). Yemen: dancing on the heads of snakes. New Haven: Yale University Press.

MacEoin, D. (Spring 2010). Anwar al-Awlaki: ‘I Pray that Allah Destroys America.’ (pp. 13-19). Middle East Quarterly, 17, 2.

Phillips, S. (2008). Yemen’s democracy experiment in regional perspective: patronage and pluralized authoritarianism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 

Phillips, S. (2011). Yemen and the politics of permanent crisis. New York: Routledge.

Salmoni, B.A. (2010). Regime and periphery in northern Yemen: the Huthi phenomenon. Arlington, VA: RAND Corporation.

Stracke, M. & Haidar, M.S. (2010). The Southern Movement in Yemen. Dubai: Gulf Research Center.